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Tuesday, March 28, 2017 - 12:19 AM
INDEPENDENT CONSERVATIVE VOICE OF THE PALMETTO STATE
Major Mistakes in the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 11 January 2017 00:00

Micromanaging and Ignoring Military Chiefs - Part 5

A sixth prominent mistake in the Vietnam War was that President Johnson and Secretary of Defense McNamara continually refused to listen to the experience and accumulated wisdom of military chiefs and micromanaged military operations. This was an exacerbating factor in the first five mistakes covered in this series: appeasement, allowing enemy sanctuaries, a U.S. media-driven South Vietnamese regime change, the disastrous military doctrine of “gradualism,”and failure to utilize our strategic supremacy in Air and Naval power. Not listening to military experience and advice was also an important debilitating factor in providing effective political leadership in war. Some crucial leadership mistakes will be covered in another article in this series.

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Major U.S. Mistakes in the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

Failure to Fully Utilize Air and Naval Superiority - Part 4

The fifth big mistake in Vietnam was failure to utilize our most powerful military assets—our overwhelming superiority in Air and Naval Power—early in the conflict. Pacific Area Commander (CinCPAC), Admiral Grant Sharp, believed this was the greatest mistake in the war.   This mistake was closely related to and overlapped the fourth big mistake, which was the Johnson-McNamara doctrine of gradualism discussed in part 4 of this series.

On April 20, 1965, U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara held a conference in Honolulu to inform General Wheeler, the Chairman of the JCS and his top commanders in the Pacific of the Johnson-McNamara strategy to prevent the fall of South Vietnam to the Communist regime in Hanoi. Also attending this meeting were Admiral Sharp; General Westmoreland, Commander of the Military Advisory Command in Vietnam (MACV); and retired General Maxwell Taylor, the U.S. Ambassador in Saigon. McNamara brought with him his most influential advisor, Assistant Secretary of Defense, John McNaughton, and National Security Advisor Walt Rostow. This was a mere seven weeks following the commencement of Operation “Rolling Thunder,” Johnson’s plan to bring Hanoi to the negotiating table by a gradually escalating campaign of bombing targets in North Vietnam.

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The Biggest Mistakes of the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 28 December 2016 00:00

Still Popular in the Liberal Democrat Playbook - Part 3

In Parts 1 and 2 of this series, we identified three of the biggest mistakes of the Vietnam War:

President Kennedy’s failure to challenge North Vietnam’s glaring and extensive violation of the 1962 Geneva Treaty on the neutrality of Laos, President Johnson’s compounding of this error by allowing Laos and Cambodia to become sanctuaries for North Vietnamese troops and supplies, and Kennedy’s regime change call that encouraged a South Vietnamese military junta to replace elected South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem. The junta unfortunately murdered Diem and his brother, Ngo Dinh Nhu. This threw South Vietnamese civil government and military leadership into chaos for over two years, which the Communists exploited to the fullest, forcing a huge expansion of American commitment and troops. This regime change was the greatest mistake of the war.  President Carter’s failure to support the Shah of Iran, long-time U.S. ally, in the Iranian Islamic Revolution of 1979, and the Obama/Hillary Clinton backed Arab Spring involving Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, and Syria in 2011 were repeats of this media-pleasing liberal ideological error.

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Major U.S. Mistakes in the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 21 December 2016 00:00

Mistake #3 – the Biggest Mistake of the War  - Part 2

On November 1, 1963, the Kennedy Administration encouraged and abetted a military overthrow of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem. As a consequence, Diem and his brother and chief political advisor, Ngo Dinh Nhu, were killed the next day. This led to more than two years of unstable government and military leadership in South Vietnam, which was fully exploited by North Vietnam’s Communist leaders and led to more extensive commitments of American manpower to save South Vietnam. President Johnson, who succeeded to the presidency after Kennedy’s own assassination on November 22, later called the overthrow of Diem the biggest mistake of the Vietnam War.  President Nixon, writing in 1985, agreed that it was one of the three greatest mistakes of the war.

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Major U.S. Mistakes in the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

Thirteen Political Formulas for Endangering America’s Future  - Part 1

On June 23, 1812, Napoleon Bonaparte, still today considered one of the greatest generals and military tacticians in history, made one of the greatest strategic military mistakes in history. Napoleon gathered his Grande Armee of 685,000 men (300,000 French and 385,000 Austrian, Prussian and Polish allies), perhaps the greatest military force ever gathered at the time, and invaded Russia. Despite fierce Russian resistance at Borodino on September 7, and their scorched earth retreat leaving nothing behind them to sustain the Grande Armee, Napoleon occupied Moscow on September 14. However, the Russians burned much of the city and refused to surrender or engage Napoleon in pitched battle. The Grande Armee had already been substantially reduced by casualties and sickness (including typhus) and was in precarious logistical straits.  On October 13, it began to snow. A few days later, Napoleon realized that the Grande Armee’s Russian campaign could not be sustained.  In snow and bitter cold, with low food rations, starving horses, no winter uniforms, and sick and exhausted troops, Napoleon began his retreat out of Russia. On December 6, temperatures on his route of retreat into Lithuania dropped to 36 F. degrees below zero, so cold that men falling asleep by a campfire never woke up.  By the time his Grande Armee crossed into Lithuania, it had less than 27,000 fit troops. Nearly 400,000 had died, 100,000 had been captured, and the rest scattered, deserted, or missing.

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American Legion SC Dept. and Post 214 Awards PDF Print E-mail
Written by Stuart McClure   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

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Bill Pray receives a Certificate and Medal of Merit Award from American Legion SC Dept. Commander Bob Schere.

 
   
Action Track Chair Given to Marietta Substitute Teacher PDF Print E-mail
Written by Press Release   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

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Family and friends of local resident Chad Foster gathered for a ribbon cutting ceremony to present Chad with his Action Track Chair. The event took place in the Spinx parking lot in Marietta, South Carolina.  After five months of fundraising efforts, Chad was able to purchase his chair. The Action Track Chair will enable Chad to travel over sandy beaches, hike rough terrain with his family and ride in the snow. Chad is 40 and is a substitute teacher living in Marietta, SC. He is beloved by all who know him and is very active in his community and abroad in spite of the loss of mobility due to a spinal cord injury at birth.

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Blue Ridge Farmer, Merchant, Historian Passes at 103 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Bob Dill, Publisher   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

Leon Few: Walking Encyclopedia of Northern Greenville County History since Nov. 11, 1913

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Greenville County Council declared his 100th Birthday Leon Few Day in Greenville County back in 2013. The framed Proclamation was presented by Councilman Joe Dill who knew Few from Dill’s childhood and attended Blue Ridge High School with his sons Benjamin and Neves Few.

A few hours with Leon Few became a living history lesson. This writer spent a memorable Saturday morning with Few and former Travelers Rest Mayor Mann Batson searching for the ruins of the home of the man who founded and operated the first textile plant in Greenville County. Few had visited the home when it was occupied. We found the chimneys and foundation in some deep woods not far from what is now Berry’s Mill on SC Highway 14 north of Greer.

The Few family has a proud history and Mr. Leon knew all about it.

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NGU Bids Farewell to Two Longtime English Professors PDF Print E-mail
Written by Press Release   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

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Tigerville – North Greenville University has announced the retirement of two longtime English professors – Cathy Sepko and Julia Drummond – at the end of the Fall 2016 semester.

Sepko, who has served as a professor of English at NGU since 1996, served as the keynote speaker for the fall commencement held on Friday, Dec. 9. She has held various faculty positions, including dean of the College of Humanities, faculty chair, and faculty marshal, during her time at NGU.

Sepko has also been directly involved in the creation of a number of degree programs, academic departments, and several courses, such as Advanced Grammar and Style, American Folklore, Literature Theory, Appalachian Literature, and Honors Program seminars.  

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Rewriting Clemson History – Again PDF Print E-mail
Written by Bob Dill, Publisher   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

The origin and history of Clemson University is closely intertwined with the history of South Carolina and the nation, encompassing the good, the bad, and the ugly. That is the nature of true history; an accurate record of the way it was, not the way we wish it had been, Unfortunately, over the past four to five decades, staff or faculty or both of the University have attempted to “tailor” the history of the University to harmonize with politically correct positions of times and situations. Historical references to slavery or the Confederacy have been removed. Mention of black employees of the earlier days of the college have been minimized, and traditions of the school and its corps of cadets have been banned from the campus. The college marching band has been banned from playing Dixie and the cadet corps are no longer allowed to display historical images including former state flags.  

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Gary Varvel Cartoons PDF Print E-mail
Written by Gary Varvel   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

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Leading from Behind PDF Print E-mail
Written by David Thompson   
Wednesday, 04 January 2017 00:00

Barack Obama will forever be remembered not just in America, but all over the world. When trying to nail down a single word to describe Obama’s foreign policies, the sure winner is: feckless. It is defined as being “weak; ineffective.” By golly, that is perfect.

Obama himself defined his leadership style as “leading from behind.” That is stunning because it articulates in his own words that he had no clue what it is to be a leader. He certainly didn’t provide any leadership either at home or abroad. Let’s review a few of the more memorable failures in leadership of Barack Obama as President of the United States (POTUS).

Recently Obama put the capstone on his tenure as POTUS by betraying Israel at the United Nations. There is little doubt that Obama sees the resolution he pushed through the UN Security Council denouncing Jewish settlements as a demonstration of his leadership. As his former Professor at Harvard Law Alan Dershowitz said, “Obama deceived me, he said he would have Israel’s back and instead he stuck a knife in it.” The US abstained from the vote that Obama engineered, thus allowing it to pass.

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BJU Displays Nativity Scene PDF Print E-mail
Written by Press Release   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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The star spotlight directs all of Greenville to the Bob Jones University Creche which was unveiled on December 2, 2011. This work includes seven pieces for the Christmas season. The larger-than-life figures (some are 7 feet tall) were carved from solid blocks of polystyrene. The stable is about 14 feet high. The homes and storefronts tower about 21 feet at the highest point. Doug Young has been sculpting for almost thirty years. He’s best known for sculpting Shoeless Joe Jackson, Gethsemane and The Patriot, Della Gillette. He currently resides in Taylors, SC.

 
   
Christmas in Dixie Special Friday Celebration PDF Print E-mail
Written by Gilbert Scales   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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Left to right: Country Hawkins keeps time with a wooden dancing puppet as Marshall Goers and Lucy Allen perform traditional Christmas music.

 
   
Major U.S. Mistakes in the Vietnam War PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Scruggs   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

Thirteen Political Formulas for Endangering America’s Future  - Part 1

On June 23, 1812, Napoleon Bonaparte, still today considered one of the greatest generals and military tacticians in history, made one of the greatest strategic military mistakes in history. Napoleon gathered his Grande Armee of 685,000 men (300,000 French and 385,000 Austrian, Prussian and Polish allies), perhaps the greatest military force ever gathered at the time, and invaded Russia. Despite fierce Russian resistance at Borodino on September 7, and their scorched earth retreat leaving nothing behind them to sustain the Grande Armee, Napoleon occupied Moscow on September 14. However, the Russians burned much of the city and refused to surrender or engage Napoleon in pitched battle. The Grande Armee had already been substantially reduced by casualties and sickness (including typhus) and was in precarious logistical straits.  On October 13, it began to snow. A few days later, Napoleon realized that the Grande Armee’s Russian campaign could not be sustained.  In snow and bitter cold, with low food rations, starving horses, no winter uniforms, and sick and exhausted troops, Napoleon began his retreat out of Russia. On December 6, temperatures on his route of retreat into Lithuania dropped to 36 F. degrees below zero, so cold that men falling asleep by a campfire never woke up.  By the time his Grande Armee crossed into Lithuania, it had less than 27,000 fit troops. Nearly 400,000 had died, 100,000 had been captured, and the rest scattered, deserted, or missing.

Read more...
 
   
Travelers Rest Hosts Annual Christmas Parade PDF Print E-mail
Written by Gilbert Scales   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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A Chief Executive Aide of Greenville’s Hejaz Shrine Unit participates in the Travelers Rest Annual Christmas Parade Saturday morning, December 10th, 2016.

 
   
Christmas Stories and Songs at Confederate Museum PDF Print E-mail
Written by Bob Dill, Publisher   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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Terry Grissop provides stories and songs for Children’s Storytime in the Annex of the Museum and Library of Confederate History where Christmas in Dixie is being celebrated on December Friday nights.

 
   
GHS Children’s Hospital Receives Subway Cares for Kids Day Contribution PDF Print E-mail
Written by Press Release   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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Local SUBWAY® owner Jill McGee, left, presented a check for $6,717.34 to Burgess Scott of the Children’s Hospital of Greenville Health System on behalf of SUBWAY® restaurants in the Upstate. The contribution represents proceeds from “SUBWAY® Cares for Kids Day” held on Nov. 17 and will help fill the Dream Gap, an array of services for patients and families. Participating SUBWAY® restaurants in the Carolinas and Georgia collectively contributed $30,134.73 from the one-day campaign to six Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals® that serve sick and injured children in their local communities.

 
   
Jeff Duncan Releases Statement on Passing of John Glenn PDF Print E-mail
Written by Press Release   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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Washington, D.C. – Congressman Jeff Duncan responded to the news of the passing of John Glenn today in a statement:

John Glenn is a giant in American history and truly is one of those rare authentic heroes we all revere. It is with a heavy heart to hear the news of his passing. He was a trailblazer for America’s space program during the Cold War as he became the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962 and, 36 years later, became the oldest man in space in 1998 at the age of 77. He also found the time to serve his country in the United States Senate, thereby capping a remarkable career of service to his nation. I was fortunate to have met the man in November 2011—he was larger than life. I pray for him and his family, but as America works to navigate the rough seas of the future, I also pray that our nation is graced with more men and women like John Glenn.

 
   
Christmas in Dixie PDF Print E-mail
Written by Bob Dill, Publisher   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

If you have a free Friday evening during the Month of December and would like to go alone or take the entire family to an event that is interesting, entertaining and suitable for the family, there is such an event available in Greenville, South Carolina.  It is convenient and you can determine the time you want to spend there from a few minutes to three hours.  There is no cost or parking fee. There is entertainment for children, live music and refreshments for all and interesting historical displays from Southern History.

The annual event is called Christmas in Dixie and is sponsored by the Museum and Library of Confederate History located at 15 Boyce Avenue in the Pettigru Historic District of Greenville.

The Museum and Library of Confederate History is owned and operated by the 16th Regiment, Sons of Confederate Veterans. Members of the organization are descendents of men who served in the armed services of the Confederacy. The Sons of Confederate Veterans organization was founded by the aging confederate veterans who charged the “Sons” with the task of “preserving the “true history of the South for future generations.”

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Gary Varvel Cartoons PDF Print E-mail
Written by Gary Varvel   
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:00

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