Sacrificing National Security to Insane Political Correctness

With little more than a year in office, President Obama and his overwhelming Democratic majority in Congress have managed to seriously undermine the economy by implementing inflationary government spending programs that actually strangle long-term job creation, threaten devaluation of the dollar, and risk the enormous wealth-destroying pain of hyperinflation. Because his policies are based on economic theories that do not pass the common sense test and have proved failures in Europe, Japan, and past American administrations, we can expect things to get worse unless the people’s outrage puts out the lights of the Obama administration in November 2010 and 2012.

0
0
0
s2smodern

There are many people who say that our only serious immigration problem is that there are 12 million immigrants in the country who are technically illegal.  These people tend to believe that the only problem with 500,000 illegal immigrants per year is that they are, in liberal-speak,  “undocumented.” They believe that everything would be fine if legal immigration were made easier and employers could have more legal guest-workers. The problem with this is that our legal immigration levels are also unprecedented. Legal immigration is now averaging about 1.0 million per year. Previous to 1987, it averaged only 300,000 per year, and the rate of illegal immigration was much lower. According to Harvard labor economist, George Borjas, himself a Cuban immigrant, a total immigration level of about 500,000 per year is the maximum that will not hurt native-born Americans and their families.

0
0
0
s2smodern

Changing the Electorate - Part 1

President Barack Obama’s poll num-bers are in a steep dive. According to the Rasmussen Daily Presidential Tracking Poll on December 13, only 23 percent of American voters strongly approve of his job performance. Strong disapproval is registered by a whopping 42 percent. Rasmussen’s Presidential Approval Index has fallen to a record low of –19. Overall, 47 percent of voters somewhat approve of the President’s performance, down from a lofty 65 percent during his first days in office. A majority, 53 percent, now disapproves, but it is the shattering 42 percent indicating strong disapproval that demonstrates the ferocity of voter discontent with his policies and proposed legislative agenda. This is an early indication of a potentially high turnout of anti-Obama voters versus a weak turnout of pro-Obama voters, unless political sentiments change dramatically by the 2010 elections. Among the crucial unaffiliated or independent voters, Obama is racking up a catastrophic 49 percent strong disapproval rating compared to only 21 percent strong approval.

0
0
0
s2smodern

Asheville and Hendersonville Tribunes (NC)

There was once a land of Cavaliers and cotton fields called the Old South. Here in this pretty world Gallantry took its last bow.  Here was last ever seen the Knights of their Ladies Fair, master, and slave.  Look for it only in books because it is no more than a dream remembered, a Civilization Gone with the Wind.

Gone with the Wind, first published in June 1936, is according to many sources, the most successful and widely read novel ever published in America. The author, Margaret Mitchell of Atlanta, received a Pulitzer Prize in May of 1937 for her sweeping historical novel of the Old South set during the War for Southern Independence and Reconstruction.  The novel was also wildly successful internationally.  By 1965 it had been published in twenty-five different languages in twenty-nine countries.

0
0
0
s2smodern

A Boer General like Lee, Jackson, and Forrest
Part 2 of The Boer Republics under Siege
South Africa 1899 to 1903

The Boer Republics of Transvaal and the Orange Free State in South Africa were under siege by the British Empire during the First Boer War from 1880 to 1881 and again during the more famous Second Boer War from 1899 to 1902. The issues were Boer independence versus gold mining resources and empire. In 1879, just before the First Boer war, the British Army engaged migrating Zulu tribes during what was called the Anglo-Zulu War, which is more famous in the U.S. because of two famous battles: Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift. The heroism of a small detachment of 141 men, mostly from the 24th Welsh Foot (infantry) at Rorke’s Drift, for which eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded, was the subject of the American movie, Zulu. But before we continue the story of Koos De la Rey and the Second Boer War, it is important to summarize the state of South Africa from 1994 until today.

0
0
0
s2smodern