In ancient Egypt there developed, over the centuries, the practice of marking property boundaries with piles of stones.  This became especially useful to the peasant farmers  whose land was flooded every year by the Nile River.  While the flood deposited much needed new and rich silt, it often took away any non-permanent boundary markers.  Over time the Egyptians, and other ancients, developed the practice of identifying their property lines using piles of heavy stones, not easily moved by the flooding river or by rascally neighbors.  So important did these boundary stones become that it was a serious violation of Egyptian, and later, Mosaic, law to move the stones to try to steal the property belonging to someone else.

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A few years ago  a friend sent me an e-mail that ostensibly was an “obituary”, but not for a person.  It was for that eminently practical commodity we’ve always referred to as ‘common sense’.  I’ve changed it a bit, and I don’t know who the original author was, but let me share it with you:

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"The Burning of the Peggy Stewart"by Francis Blackwell Mayer, 1896.

Back in 1988, during one of our trips to Boston and vicinity, my wife and I went aboard the sailing brig, “Beaver”, a recreated ship of the type used back in the 1770’s.  It was moored close to the site, in Boston Harbor, where the original “Boston Tea Party” was “held” back in 1773, during which The Sons of Liberty and their friends, dressed unconvincingly as “Indians”, dumped many chests of expensive, but “boycotted” tea, into the harbor. It must have been quite a sight, and it thoroughly incensed the British colonial government. On the recreated Beaver, there were several small chests of “pretend tea”, roped to the deck rail. 

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From time to time in my writing for The Times Examiner, I’ve used articles sent to me by good friends in another state, people I’ve known and loved for decades and who are always on the “lookout” to provide me interesting tidbits of things that they come across that I might use.  What follows is another of their offerings that they’ve gleaned and sent on to me.  I hope you’ll enjoy their “lessons”.

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Let me open this long “cyber sermon” with a side by side comparison of 2nd Timothy 3:1-5, in both my favorite “old” 1599 Geneva Bible and in my favorite  “new” New International Version of the Bible.  I know that  some of you are unfamiliar with the Geneva Bible, and some of you are adamantly against reading any “modern” version of God’s Word beyond the 1611 Authorized KJV—but please indulge me, and we’ll get through this.  Here is what the Triune Creator of All has to say about the “times” we are living in:

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God’s Word proclaims, in Jeremiah 1:5:

Before I formed thee in the womb, I knew thee, and before thou camest out of the womb, I sanctified thee,…” (1599 Geneva Bible)

“Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee,…” (KJV)

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew (chose) you, before you were born I set you apart:…”  (NIV)

I wrote a version of this article several years ago for the old print version of The Times Examiner.  It was difficult to write  back then, and I fear it will be even more so today, considering the degree of misinformation, confusion, closed mindedness, and mendacity that swirls around our increasingly ravaged American culture over the MORAL ISSUE of what is euphemistically referred to as “a woman’s right to choose what she does with her own body”—i.e. the act of aborting her unborn baby, or as I and millions of other Americans call it: MURDER IN THE WOMB!  Yes, that’s the subject of this article, and has been “timely” ever since this abomination was ‘conceived’ in the mind of Satan and “discovered” by one of the Evil One’s disciples on the Supreme Court back in 1973, right up to today!

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Like father, like son”.  We’ve all heard this saying in the past, I’m sure.  In the normal scheme of things those words are often true but sometimes they miss the mark totally.  I, for one, am nothing like my father was—not as a teen or an adult.  Despite his being an every weekend abuser of alcohol for all of my growing up years, my father always earned enough to keep me and my mother, and later my younger sister,  well cared for. He was an unloving and “distant” parent, an atheist who never did learn how to communicate with me or ever express love for his family, and my mother was always my stay-at-home Mom, providing the love and attention so lacking in my father toward all of us. 

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For the past 70 or more years, ever since the “modern” translations of God’s Word, our Holy Bible, began to appear on the scene, there have been dire predictions that “the Apocalypse” was about to come upon us, that the moon would turn to blood, and that the “end of the world” was imminent.  We still hear many of these same unfounded fears.  What has prompted these warnings from otherwise rational believers with their concerns regarding the affect that newer or more modern Bible translations will have upon the world of Protestant Christendom? 

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Several years ago, my wife’s cousin in Washington State sent her a disturbing email.  She added her comments:  “I thank God that I’m the age I am, for I would hate to see what is coming to America—in fact, what may already be here.”  I kept her email on file because it so bothered me that I didn’t want to consign it to cyber oblivion.  I read it again recently, and I’ve decided that it must be shared with concerned patriots who read this great digital purveyor of truth known as The Times Examiner. 

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Minuteman Memorial by Daniel French erected 1875 at Old North Bridge, Concord, Mass.
Minuteman Memorial by Daniel French erected 1875 at Old North Bridge, Concord, Mass.
“By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
their flag to April’s breeze unfurled.
Here once the embattled farmers stood
and fired the shot heard ‘round the world”

I’ve always loved Emerson’s famous “Concord Hymn”, the first stanza of which I’ve quoted above.  It’s carved onto the famous “Minuteman Statue” that stands on one side of The Old North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts.  I’ve stood by this statue several times, read those verses from its pedestal, and walked across at least two reconstructed versions of that “Old North Bridge” over the years.  But I’ve always believed that the “Minuteman” statue was erected in the wrong place—next to that Old North Bridge, rather than on the true birthplace of American freedom, the historic Battle Green in Lexington, Massachusetts, where the real first “shot heard ‘round the world” was fired, several hours before the battle at the Old North Bridge, both of which occurred on April 19, 1775.

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Parson Jonas Clark (1730-1805)
Parson Jonas Clark (1730-1805)

Throughout most of the night, the tired man rode his lathered “very good horse” along the muddy road that led past the small settlements and homesteads belonging to the people of his colony.  Road grime spattered both man and horse, but both were concerned only with the completion of the night’s dangerous work—the horse to find rest and food, and the man to warn his fellow colonists of the extreme danger swiftly closing in on them.  His mount felt the urgency of its rider—some type of calamity was imminent, it realized as it gathered its last reserves of strength.  The man was shouting strange words as he stopped briefly at desolate lone homes, or hurried through the silent dark streets of the few small groupings of homes in his path—words that sounded like, “To arms, to arms—the regulars are out!”

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1900 Statue of The Minuteman, Historic Battle Green, Lexington, Massachusetts. A stylized depiction of Capt. John Parker of the Lexington Militia.
1900 Statue of The Minuteman, Historic Battle Green, Lexington, Massachusetts. A stylized depiction of Capt. John Parker of the Lexington Militia.

It was good to see you, Sir—to once again stand in front of your Minuteman Statue on the front edge of the historic Battle Green in Lexington, Massachusetts.  It’s one of my very favorite places in the entire world.  When I first saw you way back in 1955, I was just beginning to appreciate what you and your friends accomplished there on that early misty morning of April 19, 1775, and later at the North Bridge a few miles away in Concord,  two places that have become virtual “Beacons of Liberty” over the decades to people who are dedicated to the proposition that human freedom must never “perish from the earth”. 

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Cole served as Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle's co-pilot in the lead plane of 16 B-25B Mitchell bombers that raided Tokyo and environs on April 18, 1942. - <a href=
Cole served as Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle's co-pilot in the lead plane of 16 B-25B Mitchell bombers that raided Tokyo and environs on April 18, 1942. - Photo Credit, HistoryNet 2019

77 years ago, on Saturday, April 18, 1942 to be exact, on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV 8), eighty young, courageous, and thoroughly trained men got into sixteen new and specially modified B-25B twin-engine bombers, launched themselves from a pitching deck caused by heavy waves in a storm-tossed sea hundreds of miles off the coast of Japan (farther away than they had planned to launch), and flew into the annals of legend.

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What has always been (until the 2016 Presidential election) the most prominent characteristic of the Constitutional Republic given to us by our Founders?  It has been the more or less peaceful transition of governmental power from one presidential administration to the next—in many cases from one political party to a different one.  That was what almost always separated us from the wild and mob dominated “politics” of other countries on this planet. 

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In the Year of our Lord, 2019, the citizens of our American nation find themselves virtually breaking apart over “politics”; more specifically split down the middle between those who call themselves “conservatives”, who honor and respect the “old ways” that were codified by our Founders in our Constitution and transmitted to all of mankind through the centuries by God’s Eternal Word (our Bible), and those who call themselves “modern liberals”, who essentially reject almost everything that conservatives believe in and honor (even though they love to assure us that they respect that heritage as much as all the rest of us do---tip: THEY DON’T!). 

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Last time we discussed the political spectrum, i.e. what forms of political organization were on the left, center, and right of that imaginary line.  We concluded that the U.S., as officially a Constitutional Republic, was about in the middle of that spectrum.  Most unbiased and honest political analysts and historians would more or less agree with that placement.  But are we truly a “middle-of-the-road” country?  Increasingly, I’m confused as to where the government of our country really fits, and I don’t think that I’m alone in my quandary.

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Mike Scruggs