In 1955, an unmarried pregnant University of Wisconsin graduate student left her home and traveled to San Francisco to a doctor who took in unwed expectant mothers, delivered their babies and helped arrange adoptions.

The baby son she delivered and put up for adoption grew up to become the legendary business and technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs.

Had it been 1975, rather than 1955, there is a reasonable chance there would have never been a Steve Jobs. In 1975 America, after Roe v. Wade became law and where values markedly changed such that a young Catholic woman felt less shame to be unmarried and pregnant, Steve Jobs' mother could well have wound up in a Planned Parenthood clinic.

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Lending money is not, as they say, rocket science.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, in the last quarter of 2021, of the total of all outstanding business loans from all commercial banks, 1.08% were delinquent.

Per the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, as of second quarter 2021, a little over 2% of the $1.4 trillion outstanding in auto loans were delinquent.

Yet in the student loan market, totaling around $1.6 trillion, not that different from the total size of the auto loan market, an average of 15% are in default at any given time, per the Education Data Initiative.

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The crises of recent years tend to erase from memory those that preceded them.

One, as you may recall, was the financial collapse of 2008 -- a collapse deemed by many as the worst since the Great Depression.

That collapse swept into power a government like the one we have now -- the White House and both houses of Congress controlled by Democrats.

Newly elected President Barack Obama appointed then-Rep. Rahm Emanuel as his chief of staff, who made popular the saying, "Never let a serious crisis go to waste."

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Periodically, in what seems like a never-ending assault on our basic values and the rule of law, good news emerges.

The good news now is the unanimous decision of a panel of three judges on an Ohio Court of Appeals, supporting a jury decision in favor of Gibson's Bakery in its case against Oberlin College.

Gibson's Bakery sued Oberlin College for libel, intentional infliction of emotional distress and intentional interference with a business relationship, because of the school's involvement and support of student demonstrations accusing the bakery of racial profiling and discrimination.

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I have been writing for years about how progressive policies championed by the Democratic Party and served up under the guise of caring about low-income Americans wind up hurting these very communities.

The latest chapter in this saga is the newly unleashed round of inflation, the worst our country has seen in 40 years.

Two important points here are that first, we can lay responsibility for this inflation directly at the doorstep of the Biden administration, and second, those being hurt most by this inflation are the very low-income Americans that this administration claims to care so much about.

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Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas is once again in the crosshairs of liberals.

This has been going on since his confirmation hearings in 1991, when President George H.W. Bush had the temerity to nominate a Black conservative to take the Supreme Court seat of Thurgood Marshall.

Thomas' confirmation hearings provided a laboratory showing how low liberals are willing to go to try to discredit a conservative, even more so one who is Black.

Now liberal journalists are having their most recent field day because it happens that Thomas' wife, Ginni, is a conservative like him, is an American patriot like him, and is personally invested, like her husband, in safeguarding our Constitution's integrity, written, as its drafters wrote in its preamble, "to secure the blessings of liberty."

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The distorted rhetoric -- should I say lies? -- labeling Florida's legislation about parental rights in public schools as, "Don't say gay" demonstrates the hypocrisy of LGBTQ activism.

I say hypocrisy because this movement has always showcased itself as being about freedom, rights and social justice.

But the reality is that LGBTQ activism is not at all about freedom and rights. It is about advancing their particular agenda at the expense of alternative ways of viewing the world.

The Florida legislation, which defines itself at the outset as about parental rights, has 163 lines, out of which a total of five address sex education.

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I wrote last week about the collapse of the Soviet Union as result of the strength, moral clarity and leadership of President Ronald Reagan.

I quoted Reagan's observation that the ultimate battle we fight, around the world and at home, is one of good and evil.

This battle never ends. Evil always seeks to advance, constantly in search of the retreat of the presence of good, as it seeks opportunities for expansion.

There simply is no other way to understand the horrible realities we confront today.

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Regardless of what any American feels about what steps we should take in response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's aggressive incursion into Ukraine, for sure most are appalled by what he has done.

As Putin moves to regain Russian control over nations that once were part of the Soviet sphere, we ought to think about the circumstances under which the Soviet Union collapsed to consider how it all might be reversed.

In March 1983, President Ronald Reagan spoke to the National Association of Evangelicals in Orlando, Florida, and delivered what would famously become known as the speech in which he called the Soviet Union the "evil empire."

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A new report from Pew Research shows that the sharpest drop in approval for President Joe Biden is among the Democratic Party's most loyal and consistent supporters -- Black protestants.

In March 2021, shortly after he took office, Biden's support among Black protestants stood at 92%. By January 2022, this was down to 65%, a drop of 27 points.

Over the same period, overall national approval for the president, per Gallup, was down from 54% to 40% -- 14 points. About half the drop among Black protestants.

Other polls among all Black voters tell the same story.

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February is Black History Month.

Why do we need Black History Month? Why don't we set aside special occasions to observe the history of other ethnicities in our country?

My answer to this question is that Black history tells a uniquely important story in our nation. It is a story that no other race or ethnicity shares. It is a story that must be grasped and understood if we are to understand our country as a whole, where it has been and where it needs to go.

Unique among a large percentage of Black Americans is a history in which their ancestors did not choose to come to America. They were brought here by force and enslaved. No other ethnicity shares a history in which their ancestors did not come here by choice.

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"Mr. Biden's campaign promise that he'd appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court is unfortunate because it elevates skin color over qualifications."

Thus, The Wall Street Journal editorial page captured, in one sentence, the sentiment of many if not most of right-of-center white Americans about the president's campaign pledge, which he appears to have every intention to fulfill.

But, no pun intended, is it all really so black and white?

May we ask if ever there might be justification for taking race and gender into consideration as deciding factors in making a Supreme Court nomination?

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With Democrats' multitrillion dollar Build Back Better initiative hitting a wall in the U.S. Senate, President Joe Biden has suggested that components of the bill be advanced separately.

One of these components is a plan for government funded universal pre-K schooling.

It would fund school for some 6 million children ages 3 and 4.

Federal funds would be provided for six years, the first three funded 100% by the federal government, with the share provided by states increasing up to 40% by year six.

Total cost estimate generated by the bill's sponsors is $200 billion.

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After a COVID-19 driven timeout last year, March for Life returns this year to Washington, D.C., for the 49th year, noting the anniversary of and support to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision of Jan. 22, 1973. This began the era of legal abortion in the USA.

A high turnout is expected due to last year's hiatus, but even more so, to express optimism that this could well be the last March for Life with Roe v. Wade the law of the land.

The Supreme Court heard last December Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, challenging the constitutionality of Mississippi's Gestational Age Act, passed in 2018, posing a frontal assault on Roe v. Wade.

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We celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day on the third Monday of January -- this year, Jan. 17.

On Aug. 28, 1963, King delivered one of the great speeches in American history, popularly known as the "I Have a Dream" speech. It is a speech that must be dusted off and studied anew today, because it contains the very message that our nation sorely needs to hear and digest now. A message that has been tragically lost and buried and replaced with great and destructive distortions.

Two things jump out when reading through that speech.

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As we await findings and conclusions of the House Select Committee on the Jan. 6 attack, let's take a moment and do our own soul-searching about what is going on.

The House Select Committee is engaged in Washington's favorite pastime -- looking for whom to blame. The sidelight of this pastime is the pretense that things that are very complicated can be made clear and simple.

And the other side of the coin of the search for whom to blame is the refusal to step up and take personal responsibility.

The latter, unfortunately, is increasingly becoming a hallmark of today's culture and is exactly the opposite of the personal characteristic that built America.

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