17-year-old murdered by husband who displayed her severed head; 'Our sisters deserve life to the fullest,' says SAT-7

HONOR KILLINGS: HOW MANY MORE MUST DIE? Middle East media ministry SAT-7 (www.sat7usa.org) is highlighting the value of women's lives after a 17-year-old Iranian girl was beheaded by her husband in a so-called
HONOR KILLINGS: HOW MANY MORE MUST DIE? Middle East media ministry SAT-7 (www.sat7usa.org) is highlighting the value of women's lives after a 17-year-old Iranian girl was beheaded by her husband in a so-called "honor killing," one of hundreds in Iran every year.

EASTON, Md. -- A Christian media network in the Middle East is highlighting the value of women's lives after a 17-year-old Iranian girl was beheaded by her husband in a so-called "honor killing," one of hundreds every year.

According to SAT-7 (www.sat7usa.org), Mona Heydari, a child bride at age 13, was beheaded by her husband, Sajjad, after she fled her forced marriage. A gruesome video posted online shows Sajjad smiling as he carries her severed head in the street. The viral video sent shockwaves through Iran where women can be treated like third-class citizens.

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Children across New Jersey and the nation are being sexualized with radical “sex education” content backed by Planned Parenthood and even the United Nations, former corporate journalist Allison Royal told The New American magazine’s Alex Newman in this episode of Conversations That Matter. The content, which comes from the UN-funded group “Amaze,” is highly controversial and is being peddled by tax-funded educators, despite concerns by parents and lawmakers. Royal blasted the dishonest media reporting surrounding legislative efforts to protect children from this sort of sexualization, especially the “don’t say gay” propaganda around Florida’s Parental Rights in Education bill. Finally, Royal discusses the bizarre and mysterious fires and explosions at critical food-processing facilities, which she is covering as part of her next big story.

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GALILEE, Israel -- Among the four million people that have fled their homes in Ukraine following the Russian invasion, more than 10,000 Jewish refugees have found their way to Israel.

Since men ages 18–60 are not permitted to leave Ukraine, most refugees are mothers with young children. They arrive with little money and few possessions, no place to live, no car, no job, no friends, and do not speak Hebrew.

The Aliyah Return Center (ARC) has been welcoming these new Jewish immigrants to Israel since they began arriving in March 2022 following the Russian military invasion of Ukraine.

ARC is an Israel-based nonprofit organization dedicated to providing practical assistance to "olim" (immigrants), helping them to get settled and put down roots in their new homeland. "Aliyah" is the Hebrew word for "return," which refers to the immigration of Jews to their ancient homeland.

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When Ovalbek Turdakun opens his eyes on Easter morning, nothing will feel familiar. Six thousand miles away from the life they knew, he and his family will be celebrating the Resurrection in safety -- a luxury that few survivors of the Xinjiang camps will ever know. Touching down on American soil late Friday night, Ovalbek, his wife, and 12-year-old son exhaled for the first time in four years -- the horrors of China finally behind them. This Sunday, they'll sit in church pews without fear, openly worshipping the God who delivered them to freedom.

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While world attention is riveted on Ukraine, another great crisis is building in the People’s Republic of China. For more than a week, the entire city of Shanghai has been on total lockdown in response to an out-of-control Covid/Omicron outbreak that has engulfed China’s (and the world’s) largest city. It all began in early March, when locally transmitted cases of the Omicron variant, apparently traceable to a huge outbreak in Hong Kong, began cropping up all over Shanghai.

Because of the city’s crucial role in the Chinese and world economy, Chinese authorities were reluctant to impose on Shanghai what has been imposed in the past on other, lesser Chinese cities such as Wuhan and Xi’an — namely, a total lockdown. Individual neighborhoods and residential areas across Shanghai were locked down aggressively in response to local cases, but the city remained largely open for business. 

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Vladimir Putin wants to redraw the lines in Eastern Europe, by invading Ukraine. But is there more to the story? Changing the boundaries of countries, oil and energy, the push for more power and a One World Government all fit together like pieces of a New World Order puzzle.

Watch this video to learn more about how regional governments move us toward a One World Government.

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GALILEE, Israel -- Cofounder and Chairman of the board of directors of the Aliyah Return Center, Chaim Malespin is on the frontline of helping Jewish immigrants escape the warzone in Ukraine. He is directly involved in providing desperately needed supplies like food, clothing and housing to the refugees arriving in Israel every day.

Chaim is available for interviews and can provide insights on:

How the Aliyah Return Center is helping to rescue and care for Jewish Ukrainian refugees who are running for their lives and escaping to Israel.

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The news that Ukraine’s president Volodymyr Zelensky has banned eleven opposition parties – including the pro-Russian ‘Opposition – Platform For Life’ which holds 44 seats in the 450-member Ukrainian parliament and has spoken out against the Russian invasion – may be the embattled leader’s first major mistake in the month since Putin launched his brutal invasion.

Zelensky coupled the decree suspending the activities of the parties, decided on by Ukraine’s national defence and security council, with a ban on private TV stations – merging them all into a single state-run TV channel. And that could be his second big error. For Ukraine’s strongest card – the unique selling point that has drawn such sympathy and support from almost the entire democratic world – has been the fact that, in stark contrast to Putin’s repressive Russian state, it is – or was – a free country.

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For members of Congress, who filed in to the dark-paneled congressional auditorium this morning, the mood was somber. Instead of the ornate House chamber, where important speeches to both chambers are usually held, the special room in the Capitol's visitor center had the feel of a situation room. And to the men and women there, wearing U.S.-Ukrainian pins, that's exactly what it was. Almost 5,000 miles away, the most unlikely of heroes had come to plead for his people from the belly of a war he didn't ask for. "The destiny of our country is being decided," President Volodymyr Zelensky urged, his larger-than-life face creased by weeks of sleepless nights. "I call on you to do more."

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Ukraine Missions during War with Russia

Greetings from a war-torn Ukraine. This afternoon (Monday) is really just about the first time when I forced myself to get away from everything and sit down behind the computer to write a universal report that I am intending to e-mail out to our friends and supporters’ list. It is time-efficient to do it this way rather than responding to literally hundreds of individual questions. I would really like to send you daily updates if the situation here would permit it - therefore you may send in other people’s e-mail addresses to me to be put on the send-out list (those can be removed after the war if they so desire). Also, short videos are being made every so often and posted on Facebook (search ‘Eugene Kozachenko’ or ‘Greg Powell’).

In fact, a second video has just come out and you may watch it now at: https://www.facebook.com/1170390209/posts/10227197569542980/?d=n

You will not be receiving a paper copy of our February prayer letter since 'snail mail' these days is outdated by the time it gets there and truly lives up to its name. Instead, I will write a bi-monthly summary Feb-March letter after the war is over, hopefully.

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WORLD ON BRINK OF 'DIRE' WATER SHORTAGE: Growing scarcity of the planet's most
WORLD ON BRINK OF 'DIRE' WATER SHORTAGE: Growing scarcity of the planet's most "precious" resource could lead to "dire consequences" worldwide -- including the Western U.S. -- as hot, arid regions get thirstier, a troubling new report for World Water Day on March 22 reveals. The report, Water: An Increasingly Scarce Resource That Is Precious As Gold, from GFA World says global demand is expected to surge more than 50% in the next 20 years.

Shocking new report for World Water Day, March 22, says billions globally could struggle to find enough water to drink

WILLS POINT, Texas, March 7, 2022 /Christian Newswire/ -- Growing scarcity of the planet's most "precious" resource could lead to "dire consequences" worldwide -- including the Western U.S. -- as hot, arid regions get thirstier, a troubling new report for World Water Day on March 22 reveals.

Surging global population, urban development and rising temperatures could leave billions worldwide struggling to find enough water to drink within the next two decades, according to the report Water: An Increasingly Scarce Resource That Is Precious As Gold.

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ChinaAid LogoChinaAid works closely with sources in China to expose abuses of human rights, religious freedom, and rule of law since 2002. While not an exhaustive list of cases, ChinaAid's research represents one of the most comprehensive and accurate overviews of persecution.

Throughout 2021, ChinaAid observed escalated oppression of house churches through economic and violent means, as well as coordinated efforts against Christian education.

Bob Fu, President and Founder of ChinaAid and one of the world leaders for persecuted faith communities in China, commented on the trends:

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Underground, it's an alternate universe. Children play ball in the subway hallways or sit on blankets watching their tablets. For the crowd of Ukrainians packed into the cities' makeshift bomb shelters, flashes of normal life are surprisingly calming. Families cluster by piles of belongings, petting their dogs and cats while jets roar overhead. For the third night in a row, they wonder what's left of their cities.

Above them, life tells a very different story. While explosions take out key buildings and access points, national guardsmen lie across Kyiv bridges on their stomachs, rifles trained on unseen soldiers. In the south, the Russian infantry has already unloaded from the sea, putting "potentially thousands" of troops ashore. As the capital's mayor and former president join the rows of Ukrainian soldiers on the city streets, someone asks them how long they think they can hold out. "Forever," Petro Poroshenko replied.

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It seems unfathomable that a week ago, the world's televisions were full of triumph and sport, international spirit and respect. Those same screens are unrecognizable now, as people from every continent woke up to a new reality: war. As images flash across monitors of explosions along the Ukrainian front, there's a certain disbelief that any of this is real. Families, hunkered down in bomb shelters. Children, pinned with bright stickers listing their blood types, parents' names, and phone numbers. Mothers and fathers, braced for news that their soldier sons have fallen. A new winter is blowing through the West, and no one is sure how -- or where -- it will end.

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On the streets, people say, there isn't panic. Grocery stores still have food, and kids head off to soccer practice as if their country weren't on the brink of a full-scale war. But anxiety and fear hang like a darkening cloud. Ukrainian Alexandra Matzota says that when she wakes up in the middle of the night -- which is often now -- she checks the news "to see if we have been attacked." Like most families, they have an emergency plan in place now. They've stocked up on food, bought a wood-burning stove in case the power or gas is cut, and stockpiled fuel. But no matter how much she tells herself everything is fine, Matzota knows "you can't remain calm when 10 times a day you see statements about an imminent attack..."

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Yesterday's meeting of the United Nations Security Council was possibly its most exciting, ever. U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Linda Thomas-Greenfield called for an open discussion on the crisis in Ukraine, saying, "This is not about antics. It's not about rhetoric. It's not about the U.S. and Russia. What this is about is the peace and security of one of our member states." Perhaps knowing the self-inflicted embarrassment that would follow, Russia and China haplessly attempted to block debate, but got steamrolled in a lopsided 10-2 vote (with three abstentions).

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