What's the point at which rhetoric forces action? When do words become incitement? At what point do political attacks get so reckless and unhinged that you can no longer heal the divide they create with politics? It's hard to know exactly, but the left is getting very close. Take, for example, this exchange on MSNBC, in which frequent guest Malcolm Nance accuses the president of the United States of sending secret messages to neo-Nazis:

Write comment (0 Comments)
0
0
0
s2smodern

Last weekend, the president got bored and decided to see if he could make Democrats defend one of the most dangerous, mismanaged places in the country. And of course, he could. It wasn't hard. He just sent a flurry of tweets criticizing the city of Baltimore and Rep. Elijah Cummings. President Donald Trump called Baltimore a "disgusting, rat and rodent invested" hellhole, a "corrupt mess" that "no human being" would want to live in. A lot of people who've never been to Baltimore claimed to be deeply offended by those remarks. One person who seemed to agree with them was former Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh. Just last year, she said things were so bad you could "smell the rotting rats."

Write comment (0 Comments)
0
0
0
s2smodern

TE Editor: We are introducing Tucker Carlson and Neil Patel as our newest Syndicated Columnists. They will be replacing Judge Andrew Napolitano. We hope you will welcome this change, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

---------------------

Maybe you've noticed from watching TV in the past couple of years: When it's about tax returns, executive orders or, of course, Russia, the left strikes a law-and-order pose. Nobody, they tell us, should be above the law in this country. Nobody. Not even — drumroll, please — the president of the United States.

Write comment (1 Comment)
0
0
0
s2smodern
Mike Scruggs