Slavery and the Spirit of Salem - Part 10 of 10 of a series

The ruins of Columbia, South Carolina, 1865
The ruins of Columbia, South Carolina, 1865

Slavery is part of world history, and it is an important part of American history. But slavery is one of the subjects Americans cannot have a frank discussion about. It is too wrapped in emotional, political, and ideological chains. On the subject of slavery, many Americans, especially in the media, academia, and politics, have succumbed to a form of ignorant hysteria comparable to the Salem Witch Trials. If you say anything that contradicts the usual, required extreme image of Southern slavery, you are likely to be shouted down without any consideration of the facts.

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Lessons from Philemon and Preeminent Bible Scholars - Part 9 of a series of 10.

Matthew Henry (1662-1714). Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1708–10). Still one of the most trusted Bible Commentaries
Matthew Henry (1662-1714). Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1708–10). Still one of the most trusted Bible Commentaries

According to the commentary of the highly esteemed Rev. Matthew Henry (1662-1714) on Paul’s Epistle to Philemon [written about 60 AD], Philemon was probably a minister of the Church at Colossae. The church there met at his home. Philemon had a servant (slave) named Onesimus, who having stolen goods from him, fled and eventually came to Rome. By God’s Providence, there Onesimus came under the influence and preaching of Paul, then a prisoner for preaching the Gospel. Onesimus became a Christian and ministered to Paul’s needs in prison.

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s2smodern

Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the Curse of Canaan, and the Golden Rule - Part 8 of a Series of 10

Harriet Beecher Stowe - Author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852
Harriet Beecher Stowe - Author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s famous fictional work Uncle Tom’s Cabin was first published in an abolitionist newspaper, The National Era, in 45 parts from June 5, 1851 to April 1, 1852. The novel was promptly published on March, 20, 1852, and immediately met with tremendous success and acclaim. Mrs. Stowe met with President Abraham Lincoln in the White House on November 25, 1862. According to her and a daughter, it was a “very funny” and “droll” interview.

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Slave Narratives, John Beckwith, Cary, NC

N.C. District:

No. 2, part 1

Worker:

Mary A. Hicks

   

No. Words:

341

Subject:

WHEN THE YANKEES CAME

Person Interviewed:

John Beckwith

Editor:

Daisy Bailey Waitt

Part 1 Pages 88-90

Library of Congress

Date of interview/photo approximately May/June 1937

An Interview with John Beckwith 83, of Cary.

I reckon dat I wuz 'bout nine years old at de surrender, but we warn't happy an' we stayed on dar till my parents died. My pappy wuz named Green an' my mammy wuz named Molly, an' we belonged ter Mr. Joe Edwards, Mr. Marion Gully, an' Mr. Hilliard Beckwith, as de missus married all of 'em. Dar wuz twenty-one other slaves, an' we got beat ever' onct in a while.

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s2smodern

The Slave Narratives - Part 7 of a Series of 10

John Beckwith, 83, of Cary, NC, former slave, in 1937. “I reckon dat I wuz ‘bout nine years old at de surrender…I wuz happy den as I thinks back of it, until dem Yankees come.”
John Beckwith, 83, of Cary, NC, former slave, in 1937. “I reckon dat I wuz ‘bout nine years old at de surrender…I wuz happy den as I thinks back of it, until dem Yankees come.”

As part of the Federal Writer’s Project during the Great Depression, the Roosevelt Administration employed scores of journalists to interview former slaves and record verbatim (and in dialect) their memories of slavery. From 1936 to 1938 about 2, 300 former slaves were interviewed, most of whom were delighted to tell about “slavery times.”  In 1941, these systematically designed interviews were published by state in a multi-volume series called The Slave Narratives.

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s2smodern