H. K. Edgerton, Southern Patriot from Asheville, NC.
H. K. Edgerton, Southern Patriot from Asheville, NC.

The Battle against Politically Correct Chains - Part 2 of 2 of a Series

As I wrote last week in part 1 of this series, perhaps the best estimate of the number of both free and bonded blacks serving in the Confederate Army during the Civil War is about 65,000.  This estimate came from Scott K. Williams’ comprehensive article, Black Confederates Heritage, written in 1998 and still available on the internet. Of an estimated 1.0 million men that served in the Confederate Army and Navy, this is about 6.5 percent. However, Williams’ estimate may not have sufficiently accounted for the large number of black teamsters vitally important to supporting Confederate supply lines.

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A Neglected Chapter of American History - Part 1 of a Series

Louis Napoleon Nelson, Cavalryman and Regimental Chaplain, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, CSA, Serving under Cavalry Corp Commander, Nathan Bedford Forrest.
Louis Napoleon Nelson, Cavalryman and Regimental Chaplain, Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, CSA, Serving under Cavalry Corp Commander, Nathan Bedford Forrest.

At Appomattox Courthouse in April of 1865, an Alabama soldier by the name of Zeb Thompson stood, rifle by his side, within a stone’s throw of General Robert E. Lee when he yielded his sword to General Grant. Thompson had participated in many of the greatest battles of the War during his service to the Confederacy and had been wounded three times. Thompson, like several other Confederate soldiers looking on, was a black man. Also there was Private Needham Leach, one of two blacks, and ten whites left in Company C of the 53rd North Carolina Regiment. These were just a few of at least 50,000 and as many as 100,000 black slaves and freemen who served the Confederate cause in some military or naval capacity.  Thompson indicated in his 1917 interview with the Birmingham Age-Herald that he had attended every Confederate reunion and was very proud of his war record.  

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Will Truth Crushed to the Ground Rise Again?

Part 7 of 7 of a Series on Reconstruction 1865-1877

Henry W. Bellows (1814–1882) - New York Unitarian Clergyman. Founder of Union League in 1863. President of U.S. Sanitary Commission 1861-1866.
Henry W. Bellows (1814–1882) - New York Unitarian Clergyman. Founder of Union League in 1863. President of U.S. Sanitary Commission 1861-1866.

The study of the causes and conduct of the “Civil War” and the Reconstruction era that followed from 1865 to 1877 is still governed by the partisan myths of the Union victors and modern political correctness. But “Truth crushed to the earth” (William Cullen Bryant) is still the truth and “shall rise again.”  

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The Redeemer State Governments and the End of Reconstruction

Part 6 of 7 in a Series on Reconstruction 1865-1877

Wade Hampton (1818-1902) was a Confederate Lieutenant General and Cavalry Officer. He also weas Governor of South Carolina 1876-1879 and U.S. Senator 1879-1891.
Wade Hampton (1818-1902) was a Confederate Lieutenant General and Cavalry Officer. He also weas Governor of South Carolina 1876-1879 and U.S. Senator 1879-1891.

In 1867, because unscrupulous members of the Union League and Freedmen’s Bureau were reported to have been inciting newly freed slaves to use violence, former Confederate Lieutenant General John Brown Gordon told a group of blacks:

"He who teaches you to regard our interest as conflicting, is not a friend to your race. Our interests are identical. If the white man is oppressed, his colored neighbor must suffer with him. They are embarked together; the one cannot swim if the other sinks."

The following from a Union League Catechism outlines the divisive political nature of that organization and Radical Republican objectives:

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John Brown Gordon Confederate Lt. General,  and later U.S. Senator and Governor of Georgia
John Brown Gordon Confederate Lt. General, and later U.S. Senator and Governor of Georgia

Political Majority Report Shamed by Truth of Minority Report

Part 5 of a Series on Reconstruction 1865-1877

At the end of war the South had not only suffered tremendous human losses, but was also materially and economically devastated.  Yet there was no Marshall Plan for her recovery put forth by the dominant faction of Northern political leaders.  Instead, Reconstruction was a plan to punish the South and remake Southern society, while continuing and even increasing her ruthless economic exploitation for the benefit of Northern commercial and industrial interests.   The total war policies of the Union Army and the exploitive policies of the Reconstruction governments had caused a famine in the South in 1866, while the North was enjoying economic prosperity and plenty.  

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