Fort Bragg
No More Fort Benning Thanks to Senate Republicans
No More Fort Bragg Because STUPID Republicans Aligned with Elizabeth Warren Against Their Own Voters

How Stupid Can You Be

Despite President Trump's Brilliant, Strong Leadership, the National Republican Party Is Doomed
They Are WOKE But Soon Will Be Irrelevant

I have been voting Republican for 50 years, and proudly so. I have voted in every election since I was 18, local, state and national. I have only voted for one Democrat in my life, a Senate candidate 45 years ago, and I still regret it.

But, except for President Trump, many national Republican leaders are stupid, cowardly and weak.

The national Republican Party is 100% responsible for the imminent changing of the names of United States Army bases in the South that were named mostly for Confederate generals as a powerful gesture of reconciliation in the years following the War Between the States, after 750,000 had died and another million were wounded.

Below, is Section 377 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, and when you read it, you will be OUTRAGED at Senate Republicans who control the Senate and did not have to do this, whatsoever, yet went out of their way to include a provision by Elizabeth Warren to rename the bases.

Senate Republicans are too stupid to understand that all the red states that give the Republican Party its national power, are in the South.

President Trump understands, which is why he has defended the Confederate battle flag and Confederate monuments over and over, as the symbols of honor, patriotism and tribute to war dead that they are. He adamantly opposes renaming our Southern bases.

Those bases are, in some cases, a century old and helped us mightily to win two World Wars and numerous other conflicts. They train some of our nation's most elite troops. I know some of those troops, personally, and love them all deeply.

There is a practical and smart reason, too, that Southern bases are named for Confederate soldiers: Confederate soldiers, fighting for constitutional government and the rights of their sovereign states when they were invaded, exhibited valor such as the world had never seen despite being outnumbered four to one and outgunned 100 to one. They are the ancestors of Southerners serving today who were inspired by them to serve in much higher numbers than their peers from other regions, as the following proves:1

The military valor of the South is unsurpassed in the history of the world, and that's why Confederate named bases need to stay Confederate. That is what President Trump knows.

The death statistics in the War Between the States are now between 650,000 and 850,000. These are the widely accepted statistics of historian J. David Hacker of Binghamton University.2

Drew Gilpin Faust in her excellent book, This Republic of Suffering, Death and the American Civil War, uses the earlier statistics of 620,000 total deaths compiled by William F. Fox, and she writes that those deaths were "approximately equal to the total American fatalities in the Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, and the Korean War combined.3

If you use Hacker's statistics, you'd have to add Vietnam, both Gulf Wars, Afghanistan and the war on terror; in other words, deaths in the War Between the States were higher than all other American wars combined with plenty of room to spare.

Faust says the rate of death "in comparison with the size of the American population, was six times that of World War II. A similar rate, about 2 percent, in the United States today would mean six million fatalities.4

Confederate soldiers "died at a rate three times that of their Yankee counterparts; one in five white Southern men of military age did not survive the Civil War.5

Faust quotes James McPherson who writes that "the overall mortality rate for the South exceeded that of any country in World War I and that of all but the region between the Rhine and the Volga in World War II.6

To personalize some of those statistics, Confederate Col. George E. Purvis was quoted in Confederate Veteran magazine, March, 1897, from an article he had written about Union Gen. Henry Van Ness Boynton and the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park.

Gen. Boynton, with great respect for the courage of the Confederates he faced, wanted to make it a sacred memorial, not just to Union valor, but American valor.

Col. Purvis writes that Gen. Boynton and a friend had visited the Chickamauga battlefield on a quiet Sunday morning in the summer of 1888 and heard singing in a church nearby. The general's thoughts went from those sweet sounds to the hellish and "fearful horrors of that other Sunday, when the very demons of hell seemed abroad, armed and equipped for the annihilation of mankind" almost a quarter of a century earlier:7

They saw again the charging squadrons, like great waves of the sea, dashed and broken in pieces against lines and positions that would not yield to their assaults. They saw again Baird's, Johnson's, Palmer's, and Reynolds's immovable lines around the Kelley farm, and Wood on the spurs of Snodgrass Hill; Brannan, Grosvenor, Steedman, and Granger on the now famous Horseshoe; once more was brought back to their minds' eye, "the unequaled fighting of that thin and contracted line of heroes and the magnificent Confederate assaults," which swept in again and again ceaselessly as that stormy service of all the gods of battle was prolonged through those other Sunday hours.

Their eyes traveled over the ground again where Forrest's and Walker's men had dashed into the smoke of the Union musketry and the very flame of the Federal batteries, and saw their ranks melt as snowflakes dissolve and disappear in the heat of conflagration.

They stood on Baird's line, where Helms's Brigade went to pieces, but not until three men out of four - mark that, ye coming heroes! - not until three men out of every four were either wounded or dead, eclipsing the historic charge at Balaklava and the bloody losses in the great battles of modern times.

They saw Longstreet's men sweep over the difficult and almost inaccessible slopes of the Horseshoe, "dash wildly, and break there, like angry waves, and recede, only to sweep on again and again with almost the regularity of ocean surges, ever marking a higher tide."

They looked down again on those slopes, slippery with blood and strewn thick as leaves with all the horrible wreck of battle, over which and in spite of repeated failures these assaulting Confederate columns still formed and reformed, charging again and again with undaunted and undying courage.

Around 44% of the United States Army today are Southerners, though the South is only 36% of the American population.8

The patriotic South believes in America and our military, and they are enthusiastic to serve and die for it.

Of course, a liberal like Elizabeth Warren cares nothing about that but the DOD and United States Army should. President Trump does, but idiot Republican leaders like Sen. Jim Inhofe, are traitors to their own party and constituents.

This Southern military tradition goes back to America's founding, to the Revolutionary War, which was won in the South, and to the War of 1812 , also won in the South at the Battle of New Orleans while some traitorous New England States were collaborating with the British and committing treason with the Hartford Convention.

Unted States Army bases in the South, as I said, include Fort Benning, Georgia, Home of the Infantry; and Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Home of The Airborne and Special Operations Forces.

 

Here is Section 377 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 2021. It is a good bill except for Elizabeth Warren and Jim Inhofe's horrible, idiotic requirement to rename the Army bases in the South.

Prepare to be OUTRAGED.

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