A new report from Pew Research shows that the sharpest drop in approval for President Joe Biden is among the Democratic Party's most loyal and consistent supporters -- Black protestants.

In March 2021, shortly after he took office, Biden's support among Black protestants stood at 92%. By January 2022, this was down to 65%, a drop of 27 points.

Over the same period, overall national approval for the president, per Gallup, was down from 54% to 40% -- 14 points. About half the drop among Black protestants.

Other polls among all Black voters tell the same story.

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February is Black History Month.

Why do we need Black History Month? Why don't we set aside special occasions to observe the history of other ethnicities in our country?

My answer to this question is that Black history tells a uniquely important story in our nation. It is a story that no other race or ethnicity shares. It is a story that must be grasped and understood if we are to understand our country as a whole, where it has been and where it needs to go.

Unique among a large percentage of Black Americans is a history in which their ancestors did not choose to come to America. They were brought here by force and enslaved. No other ethnicity shares a history in which their ancestors did not come here by choice.

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"Mr. Biden's campaign promise that he'd appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court is unfortunate because it elevates skin color over qualifications."

Thus, The Wall Street Journal editorial page captured, in one sentence, the sentiment of many if not most of right-of-center white Americans about the president's campaign pledge, which he appears to have every intention to fulfill.

But, no pun intended, is it all really so black and white?

May we ask if ever there might be justification for taking race and gender into consideration as deciding factors in making a Supreme Court nomination?

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With Democrats' multitrillion dollar Build Back Better initiative hitting a wall in the U.S. Senate, President Joe Biden has suggested that components of the bill be advanced separately.

One of these components is a plan for government funded universal pre-K schooling.

It would fund school for some 6 million children ages 3 and 4.

Federal funds would be provided for six years, the first three funded 100% by the federal government, with the share provided by states increasing up to 40% by year six.

Total cost estimate generated by the bill's sponsors is $200 billion.

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After a COVID-19 driven timeout last year, March for Life returns this year to Washington, D.C., for the 49th year, noting the anniversary of and support to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision of Jan. 22, 1973. This began the era of legal abortion in the USA.

A high turnout is expected due to last year's hiatus, but even more so, to express optimism that this could well be the last March for Life with Roe v. Wade the law of the land.

The Supreme Court heard last December Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, challenging the constitutionality of Mississippi's Gestational Age Act, passed in 2018, posing a frontal assault on Roe v. Wade.

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We celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day on the third Monday of January -- this year, Jan. 17.

On Aug. 28, 1963, King delivered one of the great speeches in American history, popularly known as the "I Have a Dream" speech. It is a speech that must be dusted off and studied anew today, because it contains the very message that our nation sorely needs to hear and digest now. A message that has been tragically lost and buried and replaced with great and destructive distortions.

Two things jump out when reading through that speech.

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As we await findings and conclusions of the House Select Committee on the Jan. 6 attack, let's take a moment and do our own soul-searching about what is going on.

The House Select Committee is engaged in Washington's favorite pastime -- looking for whom to blame. The sidelight of this pastime is the pretense that things that are very complicated can be made clear and simple.

And the other side of the coin of the search for whom to blame is the refusal to step up and take personal responsibility.

The latter, unfortunately, is increasingly becoming a hallmark of today's culture and is exactly the opposite of the personal characteristic that built America.

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One great mystery is the persistent refusal of those on the left to abandon what is clearly not true.

That is, that the means for reducing the burden of poverty is more government spending.

It all really started in the 1960s under President Lyndon B. Johnson. He declared in his State of the Union address in January 1964 an "unconditional war on poverty in America." Despite tens of trillions of spending since then, poverty remains, and so does the conviction of progressives that it can be wiped out with government spending.

Worth recalling is that the avalanche of government spending launched in the 1960s was followed in the 1970s by runaway inflation.

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The saying, "One man with courage makes a majority" has been attributed by historians to different sources.

But regardless of who said it, there is one man who stands out today worthy of this description.

It's West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin.

Manchin has been a one-man show in the Democratic Party, standing often in solitude, holding feet-to-the-fire of his president and his party's leadership, pushing back on the massive and irresponsible spending avalanche in the Build Back Better act.

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Nikki Haley, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, has served up a kind of Christmas present to the nation in the form of a new comprehensive policy book, issued by her organization Stand for America, serving up conservative solutions for our nation's many challenges -- domestic and foreign.

Conservatives get a bad rap that they just say "no." That they're against everything but never clear what they are for.

Haley is one conservative that cannot be accused of not having a broad vision and not being forthcoming in sharing it.

It's all here in "American Strength: Conservative Solutions Worth Fighting For."

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The Biden administration is hosting, in upcoming days, a "Summit for Democracy," in which 110 nations worldwide have been invited to participate in this global virtual event.

The U.S. State Department notes that the purpose is "setting forth an affirmative agenda for democratic renewal and to tackle the greatest threats faced by democracies through collective action."

The Biden administration lists on the White House website as among its priorities "Restoring America's Global Standing."

This summit will accomplish exactly the opposite.

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The Supreme Court will hear this week Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization.

At issue is the law in Mississippi that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

A decision finding the Mississippi law constitutional will fundamentally change the abortion regime in our country, defined by Roe v. Wade since 1973.

Roe said the mother has a right to abort her child as long as that unborn child cannot survive -- is viable -- outside the womb. Generally accepted is 22-24 weeks as the time when viability occurs.

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