Several weeks into the war in Ukraine, ABC's George Stephanopoulos asked President Joe Biden if he agreed with those who call Russian President Vladimir Putin "a killer."

"I do," said Biden.

Since calling Putin a killer, Biden has progressed to calling him "a war criminal," "a murderous dictator," "a pure thug" and "a butcher."

It is difficult to recall an American president using such a string of epithets about the leader of a nation with which we were not at war.

What is Biden's rationale? What is his purpose here?

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

While President Joe Biden was in Brussels and Warsaw showing U.S. solidarity with Ukraine, the 38-year-old autocrat who rules North Korea made a bold bid for the president's attention.

For the first time since 2017, Kim Jong Un test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile, the Hwasong-17, the largest road-mobile missile ever launched.

While it flew 600 miles from Pyongyang into the Sea of Japan, the mammoth missile flew for 71 minutes, reaching an altitude of 3,852 miles.

Had it been fired in a normal trajectory, its missile warheads could have reached Washington, D.C., and every city in the USA.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

During the 70 years that the Soviet Union existed, Ukraine was an integral part of the nation.

Yet this geographic and political reality posed no threat to the United States. A Russia and a Ukraine, both inside the USSR, was an accepted reality that was seen as no threat for the seven decades that they were united.

Yet, today, because of a month-old war between Russia and Ukraine, over who shall control Crimea, the Donbas and the Black and Azov Sea coasts of Ukraine, America seems closer to a nuclear war than at any time since the Cuban missile crisis of 1962.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

"It's time to meet, time to talk ... time to restore territorial integrity ... for Ukraine," said President Volodymyr Zelenskyy on Saturday.

Zelenskyy added that the need to negotiate was even greater for Moscow. "Otherwise, Russia's losses will be so huge that several generations will not be enough to rebound."

According to the Pentagon, Russia has lost 7,000 soldiers; Kyiv puts the figure at 14,000 dead.

Still, Russian President Vladimir Putin appears less pressured to meet and talk. What does this tell us?

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Speaking to Congress, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy asked for many things from the United States.

He wants us to establish a no-fly zone over Ukraine. He wants the Soviet-era MiGs that NATO allies (from their Warsaw Pact days) have in their arsenals. He wants Russian-made S-300 antiaircraft systems in NATO inventories transferred to Kyiv.

He wants the U.S. to sanction every Russian official who does not repudiate this war on Ukraine. He wants all U.S. companies to pull out of Russia. He wants all Russian-made goods kept out of U.S. markets.

In short, Zelenskyy wants the U.S. as a full-fledged ally in Ukraine's war against the Russian invaders.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive